The Tale of the Heike ePUB ç Tale of the ePUB ´


The Tale of the Heike The Tale of the Heike is one of the masterworks of Japanese literature, ranking with The Tale of Genji in quality and prestige This new translation is not only farreadable than earlier ones, it is also muchfaithful to the content and style of the original Intended for the general audience as well as the specialist, this edition is highly annotated I did not think I would like this book as much as I did Honestly, farenjoyable than Homer. AcknowledgmentsIntroductionPrinciple Figures in the Tale The Tale of the Heike GenealogiesMapsHours, Eras, and Emperors If you like reading about brave and honorable warriors in a strange faraway land, you might like this just as you d like some fantasies, even though these stories are based on historical facts.This is the Japanese version of Homer We don t really know the original author, but we know the stories had been told by traveling storytellers, often to the tune of biwa lute Like this As such, the original text is polished over the years and has beautiful tension Just as Homer s Iliad, it start If you like reading about brave and honorable warriors in a strange faraway land, you might like this just as you d like some fantasies, even though these stories are based on historical facts.This is the Japanese version of Homer We don t really know the original author, but we know the stories had been told by traveling storytellers, often to the tune of biwa lute Like this As such, the original text is polished over the years and has beautiful tension Just as Homer s Iliad, it starts with a salute this one to the Buddhism idea of impermanence.Re the English translationHere are the opening lines and the corresponding English translations Gionsh ja no kane no koe, Shogy muj no hibiki ari Saras ju no hana no iro, J shahissui no kotowari o arawasu Ogoreru mono mo hisashikarazu, tada haru no yo no yume no gotoshi Takeki mono mo tsuini wa horobinu, hitoeni kaze no mae no chiri ni onaji.Helen Craig McCullough s translationThe sound of the Gion Sh ja bells echoes the impermanence of all things the color of the s la flowers reveals the truth that the prosperous must decline The proud do not endure, they are like a dream on a spring night the mighty fall at last, they are as dust before the wind Royall Tyler translationThe Jetavana Temple bells ring the passing of all things Twinned sal trees, white in full flower, declare the great man s certain fall The arrogant do not long endure They are like a dream one night in spring The bold and brave perish in the end They are as dust before the wind Note the last second last in Tyler translation line McCullough translates tsuini as at last, which is correct in modern Japanese However, the word meant eventually in the end in classic Japanese, so Tyler has it right, and you can see how it makes sense.ContentAlthough the book is about the rise and fall of the Taira clan Heike , which ultimately loses to the Minamoto clan, and spends a lot of time depicting how leaders of both sides lived and fought, it is not only about the top dogs For example, one of the most beloved story is about a warrior named Kumagai He was from eastern Japan, so he fought for the Minamoto clan In one of the battles, he finds himself chasing the retreating Taira warriors He spots a horseman in an expensive suit of armor, and figures that must be a notable captain of Taira side He shames the man on the horse for showing his back to his enemy They have a duel Kumagai wins, and, holding down his opponent, he removes his helmet to behead him Kumagai finds that his opponent is very young, no older than his own son It is one of those eerie moments when you find yourself alone with the enemy, while the battle is still going on just a distant away Kumagai hesitates momentarily, but the young man urges him to go ahead they fought a fair duel, and he lost If he had won, he would have no problem killing his opponent So what is this hesitation Kumagai is showing Kumagai s opponent is indeed a Taira prince Atsumori Kumagai is not happy with the large reward he receives, however He now understands the nature of war, and life, and he becomes a monk People over the ages felt for the two, and the story is adapted to Noh play, etc Here is the wiki entry, which includes English translation of some verses you can see its influence on Basho, etc Caution As you see in the above example, parts of this book is extremely violent. The arrogant do not long endure They are like a dream one night in spring The bold and brave perish in the end They are as dust before the wind The epic account of the Genpei War Animosity that had been building between the Taira and Minamoto clans ever since the end of the previous two conflicts leads to this, the war that sees the Taira, who had control over most of the important positions at the court, who previously wielded the power from behind the throne, reduced to nothing.It is The arrogant do not long endure They are like a dream one night in spring The bold and brave perish in the end They are as dust before the wind The epic account of the Genpei War Animosity that had been building between the Taira and Minamoto clans ever since the end of the previous two conflicts leads to this, the war that sees the Taira, who had control over most of the important positions at the court, who previously wielded the power from behind the throne, reduced to nothing.It is not for everybody, if you enjoy japanese history, epic poetry and don t mind a huge cast of characters, then you ll probably enjoy this work, otherwise, you might struggle a bit There are many references to previous historical events, both chinese and japanese, tidbits of japanese shinto folklore, buddhism, etc luckily the annotations are there If I had to name a book similar to the Tale of The Heike it would have to be Romance of The Three Kingdoms If you have read that and enjoyed it, you ll love this The way Tyler presents the text, dividing it between the chanted sections, speeches and the songs really brings it to life

  • Paperback
  • 489 pages
  • The Tale of the Heike
  • Anonymous
  • English
  • 15 August 2019

About the Author: Anonymous

Books can be attributed to Anonymous for several reasons They are officially published under that name They are traditional stories not attributed to a specific author They are religious texts not generally attributed to a specific author Books whose authorship is merely uncertain should be attributed to Unknown.


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