The Pale Horseman ePUB · The Pale MOBI :í


  • Paperback
  • 384 pages
  • The Pale Horseman
  • Bernard Cornwell
  • English
  • 13 December 2019
  • 0061144835

10 thoughts on “The Pale Horseman

  1. Frances Frances says:

    Ahhhhh Uhtred you are quite the lad Uhtred of Bebbanburg, Lord of Northumbria is as headstrong, arrogant, and fearless as ever Now married with a child at the age of 21, he rode into battle to Cynuit and slaughtered the Danish leader, Ubba Lothbrokson Fully expecting recognition for the deed upon his return to King Alfred, Uhtred meets the inexorable fate he always believed in The pompous, self important, Odda the Younger took the credit for the slaying, and no one, not even King A Ahhhhh Uhtred you are quite the lad Uhtred of Bebbanburg, Lord of Northumbria is as headstrong, arrogant, and fearless as ever Now married with a child at the age of 21, he rode into battle to Cynuit and slaughtered the Danish leader, Ubba Lothbrokson Fully expecting recognition for the deed upon his return to King Alfred, Uhtred meets the inexorable fate he always believed in The pompous, self important, Odda the Younger took the credit for the slaying, and no one, not even King Alfred would ever challenge Odda since Alfred was in dire need of the troops and wealth belonging to Odda s elderly father Although deemed to be a Saxon, Uhtred s very essence still belonged to the Danes having lived with them as a young boy However, Uhtred realizes the day will come when he must make a choice to carry on fighting the Danes, or join them Author Bernard Cornwell has written an epic tale of life in England in the year 877 and the great battle with the strong willed Danes determined to take over their country Many extraordinary, well developed characters grace the pages of this book and readers will be held spellbound to the conclusion Highly recommended


  2. Sean Barrs Sean Barrs says:

    The Pale Horseman is every bit as good as the first book This, again, feels like another chapter of a man s life Uhtred has grown up a little and isresolute in his ambitions since we last saw him He has fought in his first shield wall and has completed the transformation from boy to man he is now a proven warrior and,importantly, he now has a growing reputation but, not necessarily a good one His glory has been stolen by the coward Odda the Younger He has claimed the victory at The Pale Horseman is every bit as good as the first book This, again, feels like another chapter of a man s life Uhtred has grown up a little and isresolute in his ambitions since we last saw him He has fought in his first shield wall and has completed the transformation from boy to man he is now a proven warrior and,importantly, he now has a growing reputation but, not necessarily a good one His glory has been stolen by the coward Odda the Younger He has claimed the victory at Cynuit as his own, and the slaying of the mighty warlord Ubba as his work When Uhtred returns to his king, he is met with distain and mistrust The coward has turned Alfred against him and Uhtred s anger threatens the fragile piece that has been made So why not blow of some steam with a little Viking raidingThere is so much joy in a good ship, and a greater joy to have the ship s belly fat with other men s silver It is the Viking joy, driving a dragon headed hull through a wind driven sea towards a future full of feats and laughter The Danes taught me that and I love them for it, pagan swine though they may beUhtred builds up a small force of men, and steals one of the king s ships, and takes himself off on a little nostalgic raiding trip He gets to indulge in his Danish side without changing his loyalties and threatening Alfred s promises of peace to the Danes He meets Svein, a fellow warrior and a leader of men The two are fast friends and together, make a brief companionship It s not too last though Uhtred has debts to the church and must return to his wife and young child Rumours of his deeds have leaked to his king and his must face his distaste for a second time Though what can Alfred truly expect Uhtred is as much Danish as he is Saxon He is a divided man One who realises that only through Alfred can he regain his former Earldom However, he is Danish at heart as they he was raised by them But, Uhtred is now sworn to Wessex and its King So when his former, yet brief, friend arrives with a small fleet of ships to hunt down Alfred, Uhtred s loyalties are tested yet againSvien looked magnificent, a silver white warrior He rode a white horse, wore a white woollen cloak, and his mail and boar snouted helmet had been scrubbed with sand until they glowed silver in the watery sunlightAlfred s kingdom now hangs by the edge of Uhtred s sword and its fate will be determined in another shield wall Bernard Cornwell does another amazing job at evoking inner character conflict and divided loyalties His characterisation of Uhtred is marvellous We know where he will eventually end up but, somehow, the prospect of reading how he gets there isexciting than the situation in the first place The Saxon Stories 1 The Last KingdomA fine five stars2 The Pale HorsmanA brilliant five stars3 Lords of the North A vengeful four stars4 Sword Song A familiar four stars5 The Burning LandA loyal five stars6Death of Kings A mighty five stars


  3. Em Lost In Books Em Lost In Books says:

    There comes a moment in life when we see ourselves as others see us I suppose that is part of growing up, and it is not always comfortableI read The Last Kingdom in 2015, while a book it didn t like enough to continue the series Fast forward 2017, I started watching Vikings and I liked it very much, that in turn made me come back to this series While the History s Viking has a different plot than this but the theme of Danes invasion of England is where both match I am very happy thaThere comes a moment in life when we see ourselves as others see us I suppose that is part of growing up, and it is not always comfortableI read The Last Kingdom in 2015, while a book it didn t like enough to continue the series Fast forward 2017, I started watching Vikings and I liked it very much, that in turn made me come back to this series While the History s Viking has a different plot than this but the theme of Danes invasion of England is where both match I am very happy that I came back and read this book because I loved it This book started with Uhtred s return to England High on his win over Danish leader Ubba Lothbrokson, Uhtred was expecting high praise and reward from Alfred, King of Wessex but nothing of that sort happened Instead he gets to know that Odda the Younger has taken the credit of Lothbrokson s death Uhtred was furious and angry, and thus he decided to wait for the day when Danes would defeat England and he would gladly join them and take revenge for the insult that he got from Saxons But what Uhtred wanted never became reality instead he reached at a point where he had to pick a side and he ended up being a Saxon and winning the war for Alfred.This book was full of battles, and tells us how faithful Alfred was to Church Even on the brink of defeat and death he didn t forget his religion and did what he thought wise in terms of Church s teachings But it is Uhtred who made this book memorable for me Poor lad tried so hard to go back to Danes but every time situation brought him back to England Also his transformation from an arrogant and proud young man to skilled warrior, and a leader was amazing His relationship with Alfred grew gradually, where they both hated each other first but slowly became friends and started trusting it each other It was a treat to read I am definitely ready to see what is next for Uhtred


  4. James Tivendale James Tivendale says:

    The Pale Horseman is the excellent continuation of Uhtred of Bebbanburg s story Set between 876 878 AD, Uhtred is now in his early 20 s, having proven himself as a man and a warrior He s fought in a shield wall, killed Ubba in one on one combat, and has sworn an oath to the Saxon king Alfred Uhtred believes life revolves around fighting, women, ale, and creating a reputation Uhtred has a reputation now, but it is not always glowing as he is as misunderstood as he is feared He s a complex The Pale Horseman is the excellent continuation of Uhtred of Bebbanburg s story Set between 876 878 AD, Uhtred is now in his early 20 s, having proven himself as a man and a warrior He s fought in a shield wall, killed Ubba in one on one combat, and has sworn an oath to the Saxon king Alfred Uhtred believes life revolves around fighting, women, ale, and creating a reputation Uhtred has a reputation now, but it is not always glowing as he is as misunderstood as he is feared He s a complex lead character that I can t get enough of following He s half Saxon and half Danish, however, his loyalties lie with the Saxon s here, although he is extremely fond of his brother and friend, the Danish Earl Ragnar, and I loved the page time that they shared together When I was twenty I considered myself a full grown man I had fathered a child, fought in the shield wall, and was loath to take advice from anyone Following The Last Kingdom s climactic battle with the Danes at Cynuit, Uhtred wishes to return to his family and his estate instead of returning to King Alfred with Ubba s war axe and banner to claim the victory and the spoils that come with it In Uhtred s absence, the slimy lord Odda the Younger claims to have led the Saxons to their victory and to have bested Ubba himself When Uhtred returns to Winchester he is shocked to see that there has been no mention of his extremely influential input to the events of the battle Uhtred s longtime friend Father Beocca was not even aware that Uhtred had escaped from being a hostage of Guthrum Odda s weaving of events to paint himself in a perfect light, the fact he glosses over Uhtred s importance completely, and that none of Odda s followers are willing to contradict him even though they know the truth of the matter, really pisses Uhtred off Uhtred expresses his dissatisfaction as only a man as headstrong as the lord of Bebbanburg can and unsheaths his sword in the King s chamber in the presence of all the men of influence in Wessex Uhtred should have received a hero s welcome but what he gets is anything but, planting a seed of loathing and an atmosphere of discord We make much in this life if we are able We make children and wealth and amass land and build halls and assemble armies and give great feasts, but only one thing survives us Reputation I could not walk away Uhtred s dream is to take back his rightful home of Bebbanburg where his uncle unlawfully sits as Ealderman He realises that by following Alfred and giving his blood, sweat, and tears to the monarch isn t going to make him the silver to raise an army to complete his objective So, alongside the gruff warrior Leofric, Uhtred and some followers decide to take one of the King s ships, to dress it up as a Viking raider, and to do some raiding themselves under the disguise of being Danes During The Pale Horseman, there are expertly crafted battles, skirmishes and duels that are gripping to read about We are introduced to fine new characters such as the lord of war Svein, the Shadow Queen Iseult, and the loyal but dim warrior Steopa My personal favourites from the first novel such as Leofric and Young Ragnar shine here too although in some cases have limited page time Characters relations change and develop finely through Uhtred s unique, honest, and extremely personal first person perspective I trust and understand Uhtred s opinions and plans however reckless they seem or provoking they are to the church of the crown The Pale Horseman wasof the same of what I adored in The Last Kingdom, however, if all of the novels in this series are so similar then I can see myself getting a bit bored about halfway through the series I hope that doesn t happen and that Cornwell continues to present exciting, action packed historical fiction during the next stages of Uhtred s life whilst keeping it fresh and interesting enough to keep me intrigued A huge positive for these novels, so far, is that at around 300 400 pages, I am able to race through them in a couple of days I have Lords of the North already loaded on my Kindle and am ready to start reading that today to rejoin Uhtred in the front row of the shield wall Fate is inexorable The fear came then The shield wall is a terrible place It is where a warrior makes his reputation, and reputation is dear to us Reputation is honour, but to gain that honour a man must stand in the shield wall where death runs rampant I had been in the shield wall at Cynuit and I knew the smell of death, the stink of it, the uncertainty of survival, the horror of the axes and swords and spears, and I feared it And it was coming


  5. Markus Markus says:

    For here starts war, carrion birds sing, and grey wolves howl A fragile peace still holds in the realms of Britain After the forces of Wessex prevailed at Cynuit, the Danes have pulled back King Alfred thinks himself safe, but in truth the last kingdom of the Saxons is in grave perilWriting a sequel to an amazing novel can sometimes be amazingly hard Bernard Cornwell fulfilled that task with style, and in the process created my personal favourite Uhtred novel and proved himself a masterFor here starts war, carrion birds sing, and grey wolves howl A fragile peace still holds in the realms of Britain After the forces of Wessex prevailed at Cynuit, the Danes have pulled back King Alfred thinks himself safe, but in truth the last kingdom of the Saxons is in grave perilWriting a sequel to an amazing novel can sometimes be amazingly hard Bernard Cornwell fulfilled that task with style, and in the process created my personal favourite Uhtred novel and proved himself a master of historical fiction The Last Kingdom was an amazing book, but this is where this became one of my favourite series and Cornwell one of my favourite authors.Uhtred must fight the hardest duel of his life against a truly formidable opponent, a strong Danish invasion catches the people of Wessex completely by surprise, and Alfred must hide in a swamp to avoid falling with his kingdom All appears to be lost, including the fight to retake England from the Danes But the unlikely allies Uhtred and Alfred refuse to give up, and they will do whatever must be done to take their land back from the invaders And I saw that Cippanhamm was burning Smoke was darkening the winter sky and the horison was filled with men, mounted men, men with swords and axes and shields and spears and banners, andhorsemen were coming from the eastern gate to thunder across the bridge.Because all Alfred s prayers had gone wrong and the Danes had come to Wessex.


  6. Scott Hitchcock Scott Hitchcock says:

    This one took a lot longer to get going than book one but the second half and the ending were very good The religious overtones to everything Alfred does makes me want to root for the Danes as does the corruption of many of the priests.


  7. Dana Ilie Dana Ilie says:

    Great bookI promise to review as soon as possible


  8. Terri Terri says:

    Oh Bernard, how do you do what you do If I could write like this man, well, I d be one very happy chick And I do not want to write like this to make money, or make fans, or make myself famous, I just want to have this skill for myself, to know that I can do it, to know that I can create magic on paper, although, Bernard Cornwell, in this series at least, isthan merely skilled, he is an absolute master Would it be presumptuous of me to say that I think that he is a writer s writer or mo Oh Bernard, how do you do what you do If I could write like this man, well, I d be one very happy chick And I do not want to write like this to make money, or make fans, or make myself famous, I just want to have this skill for myself, to know that I can do it, to know that I can create magic on paper, although, Bernard Cornwell, in this series at least, isthan merely skilled, he is an absolute master Would it be presumptuous of me to say that I think that he is a writer s writer orprecisely, a fantasy writer s writer I can understand that some people may not appreciate this character and these Saxon books, but I just GET IT I just totally get it.To me there is no flaw in Cornwell s writing or storytelling in this series His dialogue is pitch perfect, his story flow and description is natural and not in the slightest bit contrived And as I said, I just totally get it.Cornwell is a little heavy on the anti Christian vibe and this may turn people off a bit, but I get that too, because they were heavy on God back then Do you really think they would burn pagans and heretics alive etc etc. if the Church wasn t rife with screwy, religious zealots Christianity dominated society and thought Built civilisations and brought them down People feared the Church and the Churchmen They did not gain this reputation throughout history by being patient and loving of all men and women.To me, early Christianity in England wasn t about love and tolerance and goodness and peace and forgiveness, it was about greed and power and survival About jostling for King s favour and for wealth and fame The description of Christianity in this book might be off putting for some, but I think it is an accurate portrayal of those times But, please forgive me fellow reviewers, perhaps I am just a cynic.I am a woman, and I can see how these books may be too brutal and bloody for my fellow sex, or those of either sex who are oblivious to the subtle bluntness of Cornwell s storytelling and Cornwell s arrogant, uncomplicated male characters I imagine quite a lot does go over people s heads I also imagine that when some women read about guts spooling about his feet they cringe and run away But, while I am all feminine woman, I also have a very definite female side and very definite masculine side, and this character and Cornwell s style very much appeals to the latter, my masculine side.My masculine side wants to don a helmet and mail and fight beside Uhtred in the shield wall, while my female side wants to editing out x rated thoughts hereahem and also hold his horse and his hoard while he draws Wasp Sting and locks his shield in the fighting line.Of course, being his female companion or his male companion could get me a sword to the head or a spear to the gut, but hey, wouldn t I get to go to Valhalla and party in the feast hall As a man, yep, as a woman Nah, but I d die with a smile on my face Uhtred makes me laugh I like him and I get him Maybe that is all I should have written in this review, it may have been, in it s simplicity, ample comment as I move onto the review of the next book in the seriesLords of the North


  9. Shannon Shannon says:

    THE PALE HORSEMEN is the second book in the Cornwell series focusing on England before it was England Unlike the first book, there s less fighting andpolitical maneuvering and focus on relationships HISTORY at this time England was something of a bunch of Saxon Kingdoms Seven, if memory serves The Saxons had actually taken most of the Kingdom from the Britons Welsh and had held a good chunk for several hundred years Now, it s the late 800s and the Danes are seriously beating the Sa THE PALE HORSEMEN is the second book in the Cornwell series focusing on England before it was England Unlike the first book, there s less fighting andpolitical maneuvering and focus on relationships HISTORY at this time England was something of a bunch of Saxon Kingdoms Seven, if memory serves The Saxons had actually taken most of the Kingdom from the Britons Welsh and had held a good chunk for several hundred years Now, it s the late 800s and the Danes are seriously beating the Saxons up The first book opens with only one Saxon Kingdom remaining and the others having already fallen Tale focuses on a young man, who was raised by Danes and appreciates many of their values, but, for various reasons from the first book, he has chosen to side with the remaining Saxon Kingdom, Wessex This is a good tale for those interested in, well, shield wall warfare, lusty adventuring and a perspective on the Saxon and Danish viewpoints Also, the take on the future Alfred the Great is interesting b c the main character has no love for him And, that s funny because Alfred is the only male monarch of England to be termed the great all for him holding England together Look for the legend where a fishwife chews out Alfred the Great, not knowing who he is, when he burns her cakes.Also look for the shadow wife.And don t forget Guthrum.Some favorite dialogues below the grading.STORY PLOTTING A minus CHARACTERS DIALOGUE A minus to A BATTLE SCENES A minus EVOKING THE ERA A minus OVERALL GRADE A minus WHEN READ 2010 revised review end of April 2013


  10. Athena Shardbearer Athena Shardbearer says:

    I can t evenAnd I looked, Pyrlig said to me, and I saw a pale horse, and the rider s name was death, You like Viking You like badasses like my boyfriends, Uhtred You want a GOOD STORY THEN READ THIS BOOK Also, I think its safe to say that buying all the books in the series before finishing the first one was a wise choice I can t evenAnd I looked, Pyrlig said to me, and I saw a pale horse, and the rider s name was death, You like Viking You like badasses like my boyfriends, Uhtred You want a GOOD STORY THEN READ THIS BOOK Also, I think its safe to say that buying all the books in the series before finishing the first one was a wise choice


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The Pale Horseman The second installment of Bernard Cornwell s New York Times bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, like Game of Thrones, but real The Observer, London the basis for The Last Kingdom, the hit television seriesThis is the exciting yet little known story of the making of England in the th and th centuries, the years in which King Alfred the Great, his son and grandson defeated the Danish Vikings who had invaded and occupied three of England s four kingdomsAt the end of The Last Kingdom, The Danes had been defeated at Cynuit, but the triumph of the English is not fated to last long The Danish Vikings quickly invade and occupy three of England s four kingdoms and all that remains of the once proud country is a small piece of marshland, where Alfred and his family live with a few soldiers and retainers, including Uhtred, the dispossessed English nobleman who was raised by the Danes Uhtred has always been a Dane at heart, and has always believed that given the chance, he would fight for the men who raised him and taught him the Viking ways But when Iseult, a powerful sorceress, enters Uhtred s life, he is forced to consider feelings he s never confronted before and Uhtred discovers, in his moment of greatest peril, a new found loyalty and love for his native country and ruler


About the Author: Bernard Cornwell

Cornwell was born in London in 1944 His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother, who was English, a member of the Women s Auxiliary Air Force He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine After he left them, he changed his name to his birth mother s maiden name, Cornwell.Cornwell was sent away to Monkton Combe School, attended the University of London, and after graduating, worked as a teacher He attempted to enlist in the British armed services at least three times but was rejected on the grounds of myopia.He then joined BBC s Nationwide and was promoted to become head of current affairs at BBC Northern Ireland He then joined Thames Television as editor of Thames News He relocated to the United States in 1980 after marrying an American Unable to get a green card, he started writing novels, as this did not require a work permit.As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C.S Forester, chronicling the adventures of fictional British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars, and was surprised to find there were no such novels following Lord Wellington s campaign on land Motivated by the need to support himself in the U.S through writing, Cornwell decided to write such a series He named his chief protagonist Richard Sharpe, a rifleman involved in most major battles of the Peninsular War.Cornwell wanted to start the series with the Siege of Badajoz but decided instead to start with a couple of warm up novels These were Sharpe s Eagle and Sharpe s Gold, both published in 1981 Sharpe s Eagle was picked up by a publisher, and Cornwell got a three book deal He went on to tell the story of Badajoz in his third Sharpe novel, Sharpe s Company, published in 1982.Cornwell and wife Judy co wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym Susannah Kells These were A Crowning Mercy, published in 1983, Fallen Angels in 1984, and Coat of Arms aka The Aristocrats in 1986 Cornwell s strict Protestant upbringing informed the background of A Crowning Mercy, which took place during the English Civil War In 1987, he also published Redcoat, an American Revolutionary War novel set in Philadelphia during its 1777 occupation by the British.After publishing eight books in his ongoing Sharpe series, Cornwell was approached by a production company interested in adapting them for television The producers asked him to write a prequel to give them a starting point to the series They also requested that the story feature a large role for Spanish characters to secure co funding from Spain The result was Sharpe s Rifles, published in 1987, and a series of Sharpe television films staring Sean Bean.A series of contemporary thrillers with sailing as a background and common themes followed Wildtrack published in 1988, Sea Lord aka Killer s Wake in 1989, Crackdown in 1990, Stormchild in 1991, and Scoundrel, a political thriller, in 1992.In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen s 80th Birthday Honours List.Cornwell s latest work, Azincourt, was released in the UK in October 2008 The protagonist is an archer who participates in the Battle of Agincourt, another devastating defeat suffered by the French in the Hundred Years War However, Cornwell has stated that it will not be about Thomas of Hookton from The Grail Quest or any of his relatives.