Adventures of the Wishing Chair PDF Ã Adventures of

Adventures of the Wishing Chair Woohhoo I finally back on Enid Blyton again and I gotta say that I m amazed by her imagination she had written sooo many fantasy stories and at times you got a different taste from one story to another and I think it s haaarrdd to do that, hahaha..I still have 2books of this series to read and I m excited about that one..Ohh ohh I m wondering where will Peter, Mollie Chinky have the next adventure with their wishing chair And how I wish I had one as well Wakakakakak p Woohhoo I finally back on Enid Blyton again and I gotta say that I m amazed by her imagination she had written sooo many fantasy stories and at times you got a different taste from one story to another and I think it s haaarrdd to do that, hahaha..I still have 2books of this series to read and I m excited about that one..Ohh ohh I m wondering where will Peter, Mollie Chinky have the next adventure with their wishing chair And how I wish I had one as well Wakakakakak p I don t know how many times I read this book as a child but I loved it I was forever trying to drag chairs out into the garden to use as my wishing chair, which enraged my mum on a daily basis one summer I grew up on Enid Blyton books but I don t remember too much about this series other than the characters, rich kids Mollie and Peter who have their own playroom at the bottom of the garden, a houseproud mother and a servant called Jane One day they visit an antique shop to buy a present for M I don t know how many times I read this book as a child but I loved it I was forever trying to drag chairs out into the garden to use as my wishing chair, which enraged my mum on a daily basis one summer I grew up on Enid Blyton books but I don t remember too much about this series other than the characters, rich kids Mollie and Peter who have their own playroom at the bottom of the garden, a houseproud mother and a servant called Jane One day they visit an antique shop to buy a present for Mother and get involved in a strange adventure where they steal a flying Wishing Chair from the wizard shop owner and take it home Each time the chair grows wings, it is time for a new adventure, and as a kid I just loved the different places and people that they met on their travels Reading this as an adult was always going to be a new experience and I m glad to say that I still had fun with it Of course I can point at how silly the kids are at times or laugh at their outrage when somebody steals their chair seeing as it doesn t actually belong to them but it was all very enjoyable Each installment is a short self contained adventure of a handful of pages I could be picky and say that each was too short and over too quickly but they were written for kids who might have shorter attention spans so that is fair enough The kids are nice enough but my favourite character is still Chinky The pixie is kind, intelligent and can do magic, as well as having a ton of friends through the magical community.One alert to give is the name of the pixie being Chinky The books were written back in 1937, and I first read it in the late 70 s when attitudes to various things were different My review is based on that context and I won t be publishing any comments on my blog complaining about the name being used in the review A fast and easy read that consist of a collection of stories about some kids and a wishing chair that can take them places, oh the chair fly. It s no Faraway Tree book, but the Adventures of the Wishing Chair is a delightful read and one which parents will enjoy just as much as children In it, two children Mollie and Peter discover a magical wishing chair in a mysterious antiques shop it has the ability to grow wings and fly, and it does so to take them home from the shop.Of course, Blyton sprinkles in characteristically weird names, too Chinky the pixie, for example I mean, is that deliberately racist The book was first pu It s no Faraway Tree book, but the Adventures of the Wishing Chair is a delightful read and one which parents will enjoy just as much as children In it, two children Mollie and Peter discover a magical wishing chair in a mysterious antiques shop it has the ability to grow wings and fly, and it does so to take them home from the shop.Of course, Blyton sprinkles in characteristically weird names, too Chinky the pixie, for example I mean, is that deliberately racist The book was first published in 1937, in a time when it was common practice to use the word nigger in serious pieces of literature, but still.This is effectively a collection of short stories that are held together by the common plot device of the flying chair, but that s good news for parents who read to their children before bedtime the stories are both sequential and stand alone, and each chapter is the perfect length Once Mollie and Peter have discovered the Wishing Chair, their lives are full of adventure It takes them to all sorts of magical places, from the giant s castle where they rescue Chinky the Pixie, to the amazing party at Magician Greatheart s castle I have so many great memories about the Wishing Chair series and many of Enid Blyton s other books I loved the fantasy world where pixies and gnomes and little magical people where around every corner I see a lot of the Harry Potter series in the Wishing Chair and wouldn t be surprised if Rowling read a lot of Blyton when she was younger. Do you want distinct characters, rich descriptive writing, emotional involvement and that mix of the fantastic and grounded that makes a story feel truly magical Then you should look elsewhere because this book has NONE of that P.This is Blytons knockoff of E.Nesbits, Five Children and It or maybe the sequel the The Phoenix and the Carpet Blyton does here to children s fiction what Edgar Rice Burroughs does to adventure fiction And NO, the fact that this is aimed at kids does not excuse the Do you want distinct characters, rich descriptive writing, emotional involvement and that mix of the fantastic and grounded that makes a story feel truly magical Then you should look elsewhere because this book has NONE of that P.This is Blytons knockoff of E.Nesbits, Five Children and It or maybe the sequel the The Phoenix and the Carpet Blyton does here to children s fiction what Edgar Rice Burroughs does to adventure fiction And NO, the fact that this is aimed at kids does not excuse the poorness of the writing Now its not without a certain excitement Bad writers have two advantages over good ones Firstly is speed, a bad writer can fit as much incident into a couple of pages as a good writer would in a couple of chapters Also good writers like good politicians tend to be hampered by logic and reason A bad writer like a popular politician feels no need for there to be any rules and can throw whatever random nonsense they like into the plot Its true that some good books can feel almost as random, Mary Poppins for example is at least as variable as this, however that randomness is offset by grounded moments that make the weird ones stand out through contrast.Despite the very short chapters i rarely made it through one fully engaged The flatness of the characters and mediocrity of the writing making it so hard to care Literary beige The book version of a straight to dvd disney film As mentally stimulating as an Adam Sandler movie Narrative horse tranquilizer Whenever you start to enjoy it you can actually feel a fewbraincells commit hari kari Everytime someone praises this book a fairy dieswait..wait i m sure i ve got a fewok i ve just realised i m putting wayeffort into finding ways to insult this book than the author did in writing it, so i guess i ll stop P A reread from my childhood Only this time o read a chapter a night with my youngest son I read this many many years ago for the first time I do love Enid Blyton s fantasy stuff but the Wishing Chair books really don t live up to the wonder of the Magic Faraway stories.Quite disjointed really, hopping from one adventure to the next and they seemed like very short adventures for the most part, so you never really felt like you had a chance to enjoy them.Not one of my favourite Blyton stories, but I needed something super easy to read to relax my brain, and that s what I got. I ve had the Wishing Chair Again since I was a child, but this is the first time reading the first book It is made up of short chapters of two children Peter and Mollie with thier Pixie friend Chinky going on grand adventures on a flying chair Most chapters are a full story in themselves Only a few carry over If I can t have a TARDUS then a Wishing Chair would be the next best thing.


About the Author: Enid Blyton

See also Greek Enida Blaitona Latvian Russian Inid Blajton Serbian Enid Mary Blyton 1897 1968 was an English author of children s books.Born in South London, Blyton was the eldest of three children, and showed an early interest in music and reading She was educated at St Christopher s School, Beckenham, and having decided not to pursue her music at Ipswich High School, where she trained as a kindergarten teacher She taught for five years before her 1924 marriage to editor Hugh Pollock, with whom she had two daughters This marriage ended in divorce, and Blyton remarried in 1943, to surgeon Kenneth Fraser Darrell Waters She died in 1968, one year after her second husband.Blyton was a prolific author of children s books, who penned an estimated 800 books over about 40 years Her stories were often either children s adventure and mystery stories, or fantasies involving magic Notable series include The Famous Five, The Secret Seven, The Five Find Outers, Noddy, The Wishing Chair, Mallory Towers, and St Clare s.According to the Index Translationum, Blyton was the fifth most popular author in the world in 2007, coming after Lenin but ahead of Shakespeare See also her pen name Mary Pollock


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